Category Palm Of The Month

Jan 2014 – Pinanga Kuhlii

Pinanga Kuhlii

Pinanga Kuhlii
(Ivory Cane Palm)

Ivory Cane Palm is a handsome cluster palm which forms a neat clump of slender, yellowish trunks to about 8 meter tall. Each bright green, prominently ringed stem has a short, swollen crownshaft and the leaves are scattered along the trunk rather than in a dense crown.

It grow well in the tropics and subtropics regions. Given plenty of water and fertilizer the plants can be quite fast growing and prefer a shady position rather than full sun.

 

Read More >

Dec 2013 – Phoenix Sylvestris

Phoenix Sylvestris

Phoenix Sylvestris
(Phoenix Dactylifera, Date Palm, 银海枣)

A native of India where it is common in scattered stands, It is generally much faster growing, however, and has a crown of grey-green/glaucous fronds. In its native state the flower stalks are tapped for their sap, which is boiled down to make date sugar.

The yellow fruit are reputedly edible but are very acid and if at all green are also astringent. This hardy palm will grow in tropical or temperate regions and in inland and coastal districts. It requires a sunny position in well-drained soil.

Read More >

Nov 2013 – Phoenix Canariensis

Phoenix Canariensis

Phoenix Canariensis
(Canary Island Date Palm)

Phoenix Canariensis or namely Canary Island Date Palm has proved to be especially hardy in inland districts, tolerating the heat and dry conditions without setback. It is especially adaptable since it can be grown in temperate, subtropical and tropical regions and in coastal as well as inland areas.

It is very frost-hardy and will thrive in quite poor soils although it does not succeed where the drainage is poor. The stout, woody trunk grows up to 20 meter tall and is crowned by long, pinnate, light green fronds which are spiny at the base. Large clusters of golden fruits are especially colourful in inland districts.

Read More >

Oct 2013 – Rhapis Multifida

Rhapis Multifida

Rhapis Multifida
(Slender Lady Palm, Rhapis Palm)

The leaves of mature plants of this species are divided into about twelve segments, whereas those of young plants commonly have 5 segments. The segments, to 18cm x 2cm, radiate widely in an attractive pattern. An ornamental clumping palm which grows to about 2 meter tall and has very thin stems covered with brown fibres.

It is native to the Kwangsi Province of Southern China and has recently become well established in cultivation. Although generally similar to Rhapis Humilis, It shows tremendous promise because plants will also grow in temperate regions and seed is available for propagation.

Read More >

Sep 2013 – Corypha Umbraculifera

Corypha Umbraculifera

Corypha Umbraculifera
(Talipot Palm)

This giant palm is suitable only for very large gardens, parks and acreage planting since it develops into an immense plant before eventually flowering, fruiting and dying. Individual leaves may be more than 5 meter across (The broadest of all palm) and hence one can imagine the space occupied by a single plant.

The large, leathery, bright green, costapalmate leaves are carried on a stout petiole about 4 meter long. This petiole has numerous small teeth along the margin. Younger parts of the trunk are covered with persistent leaf-bases. Plants grow for 30-80 years, achieving heights of 12-25 meter before flowering.

Talipot palms are quite hardy in cultivation but have limited appeal because of their awesome size. They are very slow growing...

Read More >

Aug 2013 – Hyophorbe Lagenicaulis

Hyophorbe Lagenicaulis

Hyophorbe Lagenicaulis
(Bottle Palm)

An Intriguing palm from the Mascarene Islands which obtains its common name from the unusual bloated trunk which in some specimens resembles a bottle.

Bottle Palms are rather cold-sensitive and are best suited to tropical regions, although they can succeed in a warm position in the subtropics. They grow very well in coastal districts and will tolerate considerable exposure to salt-laden winds.

Plants like a sunny aspect and are very slow growing. They are readily propagated from seeds which usually germinate within 6-8 months

Read More >

Jul 2013 – Licuala Grandis

Licuala Grandis

Licuala Grandis
(Fan Palm, Pinang Kapas)

It originates in Vanuatu where it is widely distributed on many of the islands and is also found in the Solomon Islands. It commonly grows as scattered individual in disturbed lowland rainforest, especially in moist soils.

The species is essentially tropical in its requirements and is rather sensitive to cold, although it can be grown in a warm, protected position in the subtropics. The plants are generally slow growing and make excellent subjects for tub culture.

They require shaded conditions and protection from strong winds. A choice variant having variegated leaves is grown in Singapore.

Read More >

Jun 2013 – Livistona Drudei

Livistona Decipiens

Livistona Decipiens
(Drudes Palm)

An attractive Australian Palm with a relatively restricted distribution and becoming uncommon due to clearing of it habitat.

Plants have a crown of shiny green fronds with shortly drooping tips and clusters of cream flowers. Well suited to tropical and subtropical regions. Looks attractive in a container and also when planted in groups of mixed ages.

Read More >

May 2013 – Livistona Decipiens

Livistona Decipiens

Livistona Decipiens
(Ribbon Fan Palm, Weeping Cabbage Palm)

The species grows in colonies along stream banks and is also conspicuous in coastal districts. An excellent palm tolerant of a wide range of conditions, from the tropics to temperate regions and very useful near the coast.

 

Read More >

Apr 2013 – Bentinckia Nicobarica

Bentinckia Nicobarica

Bentinckia Nicobarica
(Bentinck Palm, Beninckia Palm)

Superficially, this palm closely resembles the widely cultivated Bungalow Palm but can be immediately distinguished by the longer crownshaft, the intricately branched inflorescence and the leathery leaflets which have two blunt lobes at the apex.

It is a very tall, slender species reaching upwards of 15 meter and has a graceful crown of dark green pinnate fronds which often twist along the rachis. The small, round fruit are scarlet when ripe. The species is endemic to the Nicobar Islands in the Indian Ocean and is widely grown in tropical countries.

Being very cold-sensitive it is best suited to the hot, humid lowlands and once established is fast growing.

Read More >